Covenant Blog
  • Rhetoric Reflection: Selflessness

    “Let each of you look not only to his own interests, but also to the interests of others.”
    Philippians 2:4 (ESV)

    Carson and brother, Colton

    Something happened to me recently that really touched me, and I thought I would just share it with you. My dad loves road trips and camping; almost every night he will come home and research where to go and what to see. So, two weeks before school started, my family and I were planned to go on a road trip. Our plan was to drive out west to California and see all the great national parks such as Yosemite and the Redwood Forest. My dad had been planning this trip for at least a year. He even stayed up to 1 o’clock in morning to reserve camping spots. However, in June, we learned that my brother would have his championship swim meet the weekend we wanted to leave. This would leave us with not enough time for our vacation. My brother had been training all year and this meant a lot to him. So, what did my dad do? He cancelled the trip he had been looking forward to for many, many, years so my brother could swim two races. He put his dream on hold for someone else’s dream to come true. This is what we call being selfless. When someone possesses selflessness, it means they put others before themselves and realize, “Hey, I have to do what is right, even though it may be unpleasant."

    Carson and his dad, Rudi

    Upper School recently finished reading the book Up from Slavery about Booker T. Washington, who was a freed slave that rose to success through hard work and determination. Mr. Washington exemplified selflessness better than most. Listen to this! By the time he was a well-known figure, he was offered five million dollars to go around the country giving speeches about his life, but he turned it down! Why would he turn down five million dollars? Because he wanted to continue to be the principal of his school. He knew that his talents were better used as the leader of a school where the main goal was to help educate African Americans. To quote Mr. Washington, “I always prefer to do things rather than talk about doing them.” So, Mr. Washington was selfless enough to work for a cause he knew was important, rather than going around the country merely talking about what people should do.

    To tell you the truth, that hit me hard. Dr. Smith and I agree—we don’t think most of us would be able to do what Booker T. Washington did. It is a great reminder that we all need to put others before ourselves, especially with our school being rebuilt [after Hurricane Harvey] in the face of so many trials. The selfless actions of many volunteers is precisely why I’m able to stand on campus, in this room and deliver this speech to you today. Philippians 2:4 (ESV) perfectly sums up the attitude my dad, Booker T. Washington, and all the volunteers share. “Let each of you look not only to his own interests, but also to the interests of others.”

    So, Covenant, I leave you with this: think not of yourself, but of others. Think not of what is, but what could be. Think not of how great you, are but how greatly you can improve. Think not of how people have wronged you, but how you could fix those wrongs. Think not of glorifying yourself, but of glorifying God.


    Carson in ChapelAs part of their training in Rhetoric, our students in grades ten and up are required to develop and present a brief presentation to the school body during Chapel with guidance from their instructors and school curriculum. Each student presentation must be understandable and relevant to all age groups. Sowing seeds of rhetoric training by requiring them speak to all age levels has yielded a harvest for all to enjoy.

    This week’s presentation was given by Carson, one of our eleventh grade students (pictured).

  • What is Your Legacy?


    What is a legacy? Is it planting seeds in a garden you will never get to see? Is it making a name that will go on for generations? Is it something that you already have? Booker T Washington was a profound African American man who often pondered on this question.

    Washington grew up as a slave, and because people regrettably in that time did not see him as human, he did not know his legacy. He did not know his father. He knew his mother and his siblings, and he knew how to work and to work hard. So he spent his life working. He first worked in the salt mines to get an education. When he was in grade school his teacher asked what his last name was. He didn't know, he was never given one, so he said Washington. He didn’t know who he was or to whom he belonged and because of that he had no reason to work as hard as he did because the family name would not be marred if he failed.


    Booker T. Washington did not use this as an excuse but rather as a driving force for him to propel himself. He graduated and then started a school. He made a name for himself but more importantly he made a name for future generations. He made the Tuskegee Institute which was founded on hard work. He made a legacy of work.

    What legacy will you make? Unlike Washington, we know where we come from. Whether from our heavenly Father or from our mom and dad. We have a legacy left for us here at school. We have a legacy left by our graduates. We have a legacy left by our founding fathers Washington, Madison, Hamilton, and Henry.

    The question now is, are we going to pick up what's left for us to do? Are we going to finish the race? Run the race the best we can? We know where we come from, so what are we going to do with that? Will we bring up our family name, our house name and our name as Christians if we are in Christ, or will we not?

    What is your legacy? What seeds will you plant?


    As part of their training in Rhetoric, our students in grades ten and up are required to develop and present a brief presentation to the school body during Chapel with guidance from their instructors and school curriculum. Each student presentation must be understandable and relevant to all age groups. Sowing seeds of rhetoric training by requiring them speak to all age levels has yielded a harvest for all to enjoy.

    This week’s presentation was given by Jon, one of our twelfth grade students (pictured).

  • Beauty, Truth, and Goodness

    As I was working with the upper school students at school on Tuesday, one of the girls assisted me in putting Dr. Smith’s room back together. We had been in this room before, boxing the books, covering the table, sanitizing the floor, and moving the fans to get the rooms to dry. Last Tuesday though, we were painstakingly taking our shoes off as we walked on the new floors so as to not track in sheet rock dust. We dusted the shelves, the Harkness table, and put things back in order. “It feels so good to make things beautiful again,” she said. And there you have it: a leader who values the need to bring beauty into the world. This young woman has worked tirelessly to create order out of chaos and she found great joy in the process.


    Later, another student noticed that some boxes fell over in one of the newly painted rooms. He was very concerned and came to get me. “Did the floor get scratched?” he asked as we picked up the contents. You read that correctly, a teenage boy’s first concern was whether a floor was scratched in one of his classrooms. Our students will forever be changed by the sense of ownership that they now have for their school.


    This morning our upper school students reflected on their role as squad leaders during the Alamo. We truly could not have managed without these squad leaders. They have been the big brothers and sisters of our grammar students and it has been an incredible blessing to watch them lead and others follow. Many said they have gained a new perspective on leadership. They’ve learned that leadership means taking care of others and doing what needs to be done, even when it’s hard. One student said that they had never experienced anything as challenging as leading their squad, even on missions trips. Another student said it made them proud when their squad was able to do things on their own because they had taught them. What a privilege it is to cultivate leadership in these young men and women!


    Harvey altered our plans but NOT our mission. Covenant Academy exists to serve Christ and His Kingdom, by sharing the gospel and partnering with parents to train students by way of Scripture and the classical liberal arts: To be discerning, articulate followers of Jesus Christ; To be leaders who are equipped to honor and defend truth, goodness and beauty.

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